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Prerequisites

This page contains:

What are prerequisite subjects?
How do you assess subjects from other Universities?
List of assessed subjects and courses
Do I have to have my subjects assessed before applying for a course?
How do I send you my subjects for assessment?
I didn't complete an approved subject as part of my degree, what can I do?

What are prerequisite subjects?

A prerequisite subject is a subject or sequence of subjects which must be completed before entering a program of study. Many programs at The University of Melbourne have prerequisites that must be completed in order to be eligible to apply. The selection requirements for the program you are interested in will normally specify these requirements. 

These entry requirements can be found in the Resolutions on Selection (http://about.unimelb.edu.au/academicboard/resolutions). You can also find this information using the University's Coursesearch.

The Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery and Doctor of Physiotherapy have very specific prerequisites. For all three courses, the prerequisites must have been completed within ten years prior to commencing.

If you have not completed the subjects at the time you apply, you may still submit an application if you provide evidence of enrolment in approved subjects in the second half of the year. If you receive an offer, you will need to provide evidence of completion.

For the 2017 intake, evidence of completion must be provided no later than the following dates for each program:

Doctor of Medicine
  • 13 November 2016 – International applicants residing outside of Australia (Offshore)
  • 8 January 2017 – International applicants residing in Australia at the time of application (Onshore)
  • 8 January 2017 – Citizens and permanent residents of Australia and citizens of New Zealand (Domestic)
 
Doctor of Dental Surgery
  • 14 November 2016 – International applicants residing outside of Australia (Offshore)
  • 23 December 2016 – International applicants residing in Australia at the time of application (Onshore)
  • 23 December 2016 - Citizens and permanent residents of Australia and citizens of New Zealand (Domestic)
 
Doctor of Physiotherapy 
  • 16 December 2016 – all applicants

 

Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Dental Surgery

The Doctor of Medicine (MD) and Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) require prerequisite subjects in anatomy, biochemistry and physiology taught at the second-year level, or equivalent, with prerequisite subjects to have completed within 10 years of commencing the Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Dental Surgery. For example, if applying for the 2017 intake then prerequisite subjects must have been completed from 2007 onwards.

The second-year level subjects that we recommend here at the University of Melbourne as meeting the prerequisites are:

Anatomy:  ANAT20006 Principles of Human Structure
Biochemistry: BCMB20002 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Physiology: PHYS20008 Human Physiology

It is possible that a combined sequence of subjects may be required for a single prerequisite, and these subjects will be grouped together on our list of assessed subjects.

Doctor of Physiotherapy

The Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT) requires prerequisite subjects in human anatomy and in human physiology (one subject of each), with prerequisite subjects to have completed within 10 years of commencing the Doctor of Physiotherapy. For example, if applying for the 2017 intake then prerequisite subjects must have been completed from 2007 onwards.

Human Anatomy

Prerequisite subjects / courses should provide the student with an overview of human structure and function and cover the terminology of:

  • topographic anatomy
  • the principles related to key anatomical structures skin, fascia and skeletal muscles, bones and joints, vessels, nerves and viscera
  • the organisation of the body into regions and the anatomy of the major organ systems.

Human Physiology

Prerequisite subjects / courses should cover the basic principles of human physiology and may include:

  • basic cellular function
  • homeostasis
  • systems physiology including respiratory and cardiovascular, as well as responses to stress and exercise.

Approved anatomy and physiology subjects / courses for the MD and DDS will satisfy the requirements for the Doctor of Physiotherapy. A list of additional subjects / courses which have been approved specifically for the Doctor of Physiotherapy is available from entry requirements for the DPT.

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How do you assess subjects from other Universities?

For the DPT please refer to the guidelines above on human anatomy and human physiology.

For the MD and DDS we compare your subjects to the recommended subjects at the University of Melbourne using the following criteria:

Anatomy

Year level: 2nd year equivalent
Lecture program: The number and content of the lectures (in the gross anatomy component of an integrated course) must be equivalent to ANAT20006 Principles of Human Structure
Labs: There must be a lab component to the course which includes human cadaveric material as a resource.
Text book: Standard human anatomy texts should be the prescribed resource

ANAT20006: Principles of Human Structure overview
This subject covers the terminology of topographic anatomy; the principles related to key anatomical structures: skin, fascia and skeletal muscles, bones and joints, vessels, nerves and viscera; the organisation of the body into regions and the anatomy of the major organ systems. The material is presented in 36 x 1hour lectures, 4 x 2hour wet labs and 8 Anatomy-Directed-Self-Learning. The university handbook has more information.

Physiology

Year level: 2nd year equivalent
Lecture program: The number and content of the lectures (in the physiology component of an integrated course) must be equivalent to PHYS20008 Human Physiology.
Text book: The recommended text for this unit is D. Silverthorn “Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach”.

PHYS20008: Human Physiology overview
Physiology is the study of the normal functioning of living organisms. The 2nd year course at Melbourne focuses on neuro-endocrine control mechanisms and homeostasis in humans, with specific content on basic mechanisms of excitable tissues, nerve-nerve and nerve-tissue communication, autonomic nervous system, skeletal muscle, and the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and excretory systems. Interactive learning is emphasized in lectures (34 in total) and self-directed, computer-assisted tutorials (6). The university handbook has further information.

Biochemistry

Year level: 2nd year equivalent
Approved pre-requisite subjects would be deemed equivalent BCMB20002 based on the following criteria:
Lecture program: The number and content of the lectures must be equivalent to BCMB20002 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

BCMB20002: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology overview:
30 x 1 hour lectures or more (a semester). The content must build on strong chemistry prerequisites to cover biochemical structures of protein, polysaccharides and nucleic acids dealing with monomeric units and the biological polymers. The function of enzymes should be covered and DNA functions. Metabolism should include glycolysis, pentose phosphate, Krebs cycle and oxidative phoshorylation. The university handbook has further information.
Labs: There is no specific requirement for a lab component
Text book: A standard biochemistry text should be the prescribed (e.g. Stryer or Lehninger).

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List of assessed subjects and courses

We have assessed a large number of subjects and courses from Australian and international institutions. If the subjects / courses you have studied are not included in the lists below, please submit an assessment request to the Learning & Teaching Unit via our prerequisite assessment form. We are happy to assess combinations of subjects / courses if you feel that you have covered the required content.

Subjects and courses that have been assessed from Australian, New Zealand and international institutions are available on the following PDF files:

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Do I have to have my subjects assessed before applying for a course?

If your subjects have not been previously assessed, we strongly recommend having your subjects assessed well in advance of applying. The assessment process may be lengthy, so we recommend having your subjects assessed one year in advance of applying.

Prospective applicants for the 2017 intake of the MD, DDS or DPT are encouraged to submit documentation through the prerequisite assessment form by Friday 6 May 2016. This will ensure you are advised of the outcome before the closing date for applications. Submissions received after this date will still be processed and the outcome issued within three weeks of submission.

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How do I send you my subjects for assessment?

Please first check if your subjects and courses have already been assessed, including those from International Institutions.

To have your subjects / courses assessed please use the prerequisite assessment form:

Submit subjects / courses for assessment
 

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I didn’t complete an approved subject as part of my degree, what can I do?

You must complete an approved subject or course in order to be eligible to apply for admission, no exemptions will be granted, but that subject / course does not have to be part of a degree (though it must be passed). Most universities have a program enabling you to take subjects / courses through single enrolment or non-degree study. At the University of Melbourne this is called the Community Access Program (CAP). The three recommended University of Melbourne prerequisite subjects are available via CAP, however please note that a quota applies to ANAT20006: Principles of Human Structure. For more information on this quota click here

Prospective applicants for the MD, DDS or DPT must show evidence that they have completed or enrolled in the approved prerequisites at the time of application.

Please note that due to Australian law, it is not possible for international students to obtain a student visa to study CAP subjects at the University of Melbourne.

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